Best and Worst Store-bought Bagels – Eat This, Not That

It’s no secret that the bagel has established itself in American culture as a must-have breakfast option. Over the years, the popularity of the bagel has skyrocketed to the point that today it can be found on every bread rack and freezer in grocery stores. Multiple flavors have evolved for the US market over the years, from whole wheat and multigrain varieties to bagels with fun flavors like cinnamon sugar and all. With all of these options now available, it can be difficult to decide which store-bought bagels you should buy if you want to eat healthy. Especially since so many options are pretty, well, unhealthy for you.

Bagels are naturally high in carbohydrates – they’re bread after all. Many of these store-bought bagels are also high in added sugar, which will quickly burn your system and leave you hungry long before lunchtime. To help keep your diet on track, we’ve scoured plenty of bread aisles to help decide which exactly are the unhealthy bagels and which aren’t as bad.

Here, we’ve ranked the options from least bad to worst. And just to let you know, here are the 21 best healthy cooking tips of all time!

For 1 bagel: 200 calories, 1.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 400 mg sodium, 38 g carbohydrate (6 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 10 g protein

You’d think whole wheat bagel options might not be on this list, but make no mistake about it. While the whole wheat option has 6 grams of fiber filling, it still has similar health benefits to the plain bagel. Still, if you need a solid bagel, these are good choices that contain less sugar.

lender egg bagels in packaging

For 1 bagel: 210 calories, 1.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 350 mg sodium, 40 g carbohydrate (1 g fiber, 3 g sugar), 8 g protein

The Lender’s Egg Bagel keeps the sugar to a bare minimum in this bagel. And at just 210 calories, it’s also one of the low-calorie bagels on this list.

Bubbas whole wheat honey bagels in a package

For 1 bagel: 210 calories, 1.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 380 mg sodium, 42 g carbohydrate (8 g fiber, 4 g sugar), 9 g protein

For a bagel with “honey” in the name, you’d think Bubba’s whole wheat honey bagel would add extra sugar, but there’s no high fructose corn syrup here. Fortunately, it only contains 4 grams of sugar.

thomas bagels plain in packaging

For 1 bagel: 270 calories, 1.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat), 450 mg sodium, 53 g carbohydrates (2 g fiber, 6 g sugar), 9 g protein

When you’re really watching your sugar intake but still craving a morning bagel, the plain option is usually a better choice. While it’s still high in calories and sodium, the lack of added toppings keeps added sugar to a minimum so you can add other spreads like peanut butter.

French toast lenders in bagels

For 1 bagel: 220 calories, 1.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 290 mg sodium, 45 g carbohydrate (2 g fiber, 7 g sugar), 7 g protein

You might have guessed that a bagel with French toast in the name adds unnecessary sugar, and you’d be right! Cinnamon swirls push this bagel to the limit of acceptable diet territory. When you topping this bagel with a sweet spread or butter, you’re having trouble because all the sugar in here is added sugar.

RELATED: Recipes without added sugar you will be really looking forward to eating.

blueberry bagels

For 1 bagel: 280 calories, 2 g fat (1 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 390 mg sodium, 55 g carbohydrate (2 g fiber, 9 g sugar), 9 g protein

A bagel with blueberries looks healthy, but as a general rule, fruits tend to add extra sugar to whatever item they appear in. While there is no high fructose corn syrup, Thomas’ blueberry bagels are still high in calories and sugar.

thomas cranberry bagels in wrapper

For 1 bagel: 250 calories, 1.5 g of fat (0.5 g of saturated fat, 0 g of trans fat), 420 mg of sodium, 51 g of carbohydrates (2 g of fiber, 10 g of sugar), 9 g of protein

Thomas Cranberry Bagels also contain extra sugar in a bagel by including fruit. The 10 grams of added sugar has a pragmatic function, as it masks the bitterness of cranberries, providing an illusion of health. Treat yourself and avoid cranberry baked goods altogether to keep your diet on the safe side.

Sara lee cinnamon raisins bagels in packaging

For 1 bagel: 260 calories, 0.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 350 mg sodium, 54 g carbohydrate (2 g fiber, 11 g sugar), 8 g protein

If a bagel sounds too good to be true, don’t count on it to fit into your daily diet. Cinnamon is making a comeback to the list and pairs with raisins, another competitor for boosting the sugar content. When you combine this bagel with any spread, you can easily forgo your diet for the day.

Pepperidge Farm Cinnamon Raisin Swirl Bagels

For 1 bagel: 270 calories, 1 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 290 mg sodium, 57 g carbohydrate (3 g fiber, 14 g sugar), 9 g protein

This bagel pushes the limits for how much sugar you can pack in a bagel – it might as well be a pastry! Unless you want to have dessert for breakfast, stick to any other bagel.

raisin and cinnamon bagel from the canyon bakehouse

For 1 bagel: 250 calories, 4 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 410 mg sodium, 51 g carbohydrate (2 g fiber, 14 g sugar), 3 g protein

While this bagel is gluten, dairy, soy and nut free, that doesn’t automatically make it the healthiest option on the market. Canyon Bakehouse’s Cinnamon Raisin Bagels are always loaded with sugar, with one bagel containing 14 grams of the sweet substance.

Comments are closed.